Military Monday: A New World War I Resource

As part of the commemorations for the start of World War I, Ancestry has released a new resource. Called U.S., Army Transport Service, Passenger Lists, 1910-1939, it’s a database containing images of the passenger lists for ships that carried U.S. troops during the time period 1910-1939.  Each list includes details on the ship’s departure or arrival (if they were coming to the United States), the names of the passenger, their service unit, and their next of kin and where those next of kin were living.

Why is this database helpful? First, it confirms someone’s service in the military. You even have unit information, so you can learn more about their service by searching regimental history.  Second, it can prove relationships. Some next of kin listings include how the two are related: cousins, mother, etc.  I found a few Connecticut families who might benefit from checking out this source.

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Military Monday: Did your ancestor serve in World War I?

Have you ever heard of the Yeomanettes? Women in their teens and twenties were enlisted in the Navy as part of the military effort to support the First World War. Most served as stenographers or clerks, although a few were posted overseas. Their service likely provided the ground work for women’s units during World War II – and women’s roles in the modern military.

One of their bases was New London, Connecticut. Women staffed offices so that men could be deployed overseas. My own great-grandmother served her enlistment out at New London.

Don’t forget to check military records for your female ancestors! Many are listed in rosters issued by the local Adjutant General’s office. From there, you can order their service records. Who knows what you might find.